Minecraft is now available for cross-play on any device

Minecraft

With the launch of Microsoft’s new Xbox One X gamers got an update on the latest Minecraft news — chiefly that Minecraft is now available across any device.

As part of the company’s big show at E3 Microsoft talked about the latest Minecraft update.

The Better Together Update” unifies console, mobile and Windows 10 versions of the game.

The new update also features better graphics and cross-platform support to let Windows 10 and mobile Minecraft players play the game together.

As part of the update, Minecraft is ditching any special branding associated with Minecraft for Xbox One, Nintendo Switch, mobile games or VR — they’ll all just be known as “Minecraft”. There’s a ‘Minecraft: Java Edition’, which is the original PC game (still supported).

Minecraft

The unified branding is designed to let buyers know they’re all getting the same game, that they can play with anyone no matter what device they’re using, the company said.

Supported devices for unified game play include:

  • Windows 10
  • iOS
  • Android
  • XBox One
  • Nintendo’s Switch

If players own Minecraft for mobile or VR, they’ll get an update for the summer. Minecraft for Xbox One or Nintendo Switch owners will get a new update for free, and the existing worlds that gamers have created are going to be available on the new game.

The new update also means that any downloadable content will be available across all devices. So a pack bought on mobile will also be available on Xbox and Windows 10 editions too.

Minecraft

As an additional added perk, Minecraft is throwing in a server browser to its latest update. Launching with four servers, Lifeboat, Mineplex, InPVP and Cubecraft — which lets players join public servers that have monthly users numbering in the millions according to the company.

It’s different from Minecraft Realms, which are privately cloud-hosted servers available for smaller groups.

Finally, there’s a new graphics pack for 4K viewing — better lighting, shadows, and water effects, the company said.

Article by Jonathan Shieber from Techcrunch